Myo Plus - Educational videos

Watch the videos below to learn more the Myo Plus fitting process.

Myo Plus pattern recognition

1. Evaluation with Myo Cuff

This video shows how to use the Myo Cuff and the Myo Plus app to evaluate the user-generated motion patterns for prosthesis control.

Myo Plus Pattern Recognition is Ottobock's self-learning prosthetic hand control. The completely newly developed control unit recognizes the user's mental commands and translates them into prosthesis movements.

Myo Plus offers users a significant improvement in the intuitive control of a hand prosthesis. This is possible because Myo Plus learns how the user's phantom hand movements affect the muscle activity of the residual limb. The Myo Cuff - a flexible electrode cuff that can be applied quickly and easily - determines whether Myo Plus is suitable for the user.

Most amputees can still feel and move their missing hand. These movements are called phantom hand movements. Phantom hand movements are associated with muscle contractions that Myo Plus recognizes as movement patterns. A good muscle mobility and imagination of the phantom hand lead to more movement patterns. As a result, improved prosthesis control is achieved. Different movement patterns are therefore necessary for the Myo Plus control. The Myo cuff is used before the actual prosthesis fitting to evaluate how many movement patterns are available to the user.

The Myo Plus Pattern Recognition thus ensures particularly simple, intuitive and smooth prosthesis control - without any complicated, time-consuming switching between individual handle types. It makes it possible for the first time ever to fully exploit the potential of highly complex, multi-articulating prosthetic hands. The prosthesis can be controlled much more intuitively and with noticeably less mental effort.

The newly developed Myo App is the central interface between user and control unit. In a sense, it functions as a "window into the prosthesis" and visualizes the hidden movement patterns in the residual limb. While the prosthesis was previously a kind of "black box" for technicians, users and therapists, the movement patterns in the app are now directly visible for the first time.

2. Preparing an interim fitting

After a successful evaluation with the Myo Cuff in the first step, a Myo Plus interim prosthesis is fabricated in the second step. This video shows how the electrodes are positioned and mounted in the inner socket, how the system is wired and how functionality is tested.

Myo Plus Pattern Recognition is Ottobock's self-learning control for hand prostheses. The completely newly developed control unit recognizes the user's mental commands and translates them into prosthesis movements.

Myo Plus offers users a significant improvement in the intuitive control of a hand prosthesis. This is possible because Myo Plus learns how the user's phantom hand movements affect the muscle activity of the residual limb. The Myo Cuff - a flexible electrode cuff that can be applied quickly and easily - determines whether Myo Plus is suitable for the user.

Most amputees can still feel and move their missing hand. These movements are called phantom hand movements. Phantom hand movements are associated with muscle contractions that Myo Plus recognizes as movement patterns. A good muscle mobility and imagination of the phantom hand lead to more movement patterns. As a result, improved prosthesis control is achieved. Different movement patterns are therefore necessary for the Myo Plus control. The Myo Cuff is used before the actual prosthesis fitting to evaluate how many movement patterns are available to the user.

The Myo Plus Pattern Recognition thus ensures particularly simple, intuitive and smooth prosthesis control - without any complicated, time-consuming switching between individual grip patterns. It makes it possible for the first time ever to fully exploit the potential of highly complex, multi-articulating prosthetic hands. The prosthesis can be controlled much more intuitively and with noticeably less mental effort.

The newly developed Myo App is the central interface between user and control unit. In a sense, it functions as a "window into the prosthesis" and visualizes the hidden movement patterns in the residual limb. While the prosthesis was previously a kind of "black box" for technicians, users and therapists, the movement patterns in the app are now directly visible for the first time.